Social Media and the Death of Privacy

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If I’m being honest social media is not my forte. I rarely post pictures to my Snapchat story or update my Facebook status and I tweet only when forced to. Each of the platforms I use serves a purpose: Facebook allows me to keep in contact with my best friend when he is home in Thailand; Snapchat allows me to take stupid pictures of myself with funny filters to send to my stepmom; and Twitter was forced upon me by my desire to become a journalist.

My reasons for despising most social media platforms is rooted in my family’s general desire to keep their cards close to their chest. This is especially prevalent in one family member’s case. He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease a few years ago. As a man on disability he is subjected to insurance fraud inspections, which can include former FBI agent showing up on our doorstep to investigate him (yes, this actually happened). The man walks with two canes and yet a picture on Facebook can spell the end to his disability. This may sound like the ramblings of an over-dramatic ex-theater kid, but I cannot tell you how much I wish I were joking.

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Photo courtesy of Jack Moreh and freerangestock.com

The truth is the more I learn about social media and its ability to track our daily activities the more hesitant I am to use it. Although I applaud the various CEOs who push back against the government’s ever growing power, I cede that United States citizens are far more likely to give up their privacy in favor of feeling secure than they are to defend their rights against unreasonable search and seizure.

As paranoid as I sound I do enjoy the contact that Facebook and Snapchat have afforded me. A few close friends reside abroad (whether for the semester or for life) and through social media I am able to keep up with their lives.

Although communication itself is easier in the age of social media, connection on a deeper level is far more difficult. LOLs and emojis have overtaken heartfelt conversation and defriending has taken the place of interpersonal conflict.

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One thought on “Social Media and the Death of Privacy

  1. This is an impactful post- it really made me think about how much our generation depends on social media as a way to connect with others. With the rise of social media as a primary from of communication, are we losing the ability to make meaningful connections with others?

    Liked by 1 person

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